How to Train a Dog That Has Excited Accidents

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There’s nothing better than seeing your dog get excited when you come home from a long day of work. That wagging tail and those fast feet greeting you at the door can turn your whole day around. However, the last thing you want to have to deal with during that excitement is an accident from your four-legged friend.

Unfortunately, it happens.

It’s not uncommon for dogs to pee when they get excited or nervous. Nevertheless, if your dog tends to have accidents during play or greetings, or even out of anxiety when they are in an unfamiliar situation, it’s possible to train them and help to avoid those accidents.

If you have a puppy, starting to train them as soon as possible will make it easier to avoid excited accidents in the future. But, if you have a full-grown dog who still struggles with peeing in the house when they’re excited, it’s not too late.

First, it’s important to know why excited accidents happen. The more you understand what’s going on in your dog’s mind and body, the easier it will be to train them the right way. Let’s cover why some dogs have these types of accidents, and what you can do about it.

Understand the Behavioral Reasons

Before you start to train your dog to stop peeing when they’re excited, rule out any health-related conditions that could be causing the problem. Some of the most common medical issues that could cause your dog to pee indoors include:

  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Changes in diet
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Old age/incontinence

If your dog does have a medical issue, accidents may just be inevitable. You certainly don’t want to scold or punish your dog for urinating indoors if they can’t help it. While you can take them out more frequently and continue to encourage better “potty habits,” you might have to resign to cleaning up messes more often than not. Cleaning up pet urine and eliminating odors isn’t always easy, but wiping things up as soon as possible and deodorizing with anti-bacterial oils can help to keep your home clean and smelling fresh. Lavender, lemon, peppermint oils are all fantastic options to eliminate the smell of pet pee quickly.

If your dog is healthy and peeing when they greet you or interact with you, it’s likely excitement urination. This type of urination, also called “submissive peeing,” only occurs due to human interaction and doesn’t result from separation anxiety or other behavioral issues.

While it’s nice to know your dog is happy to see you, no one wants to clean up a mess or deal with dog pee every time they greet their pooch. Thankfully, you can train your dog and help them to stop urinating on the floor whenever you come home or interact with them.

How to Help Your Dog With Excitement Urination

Before you start training your dog, it’s a good idea to learn what their “triggers” are. Some of the most common situations that might cause your dog to experience excitement urination include:

  • A stranger approaching to pet them
  • Active play
  • You coming home after being gone all day
  • You entering the same room as your dog after being somewhere else for a while

 When you better understand your dog’s triggers, you can work on managing their responses specifically for those situations.

 One of the best things you can do is to make sure your dog (especially if they’re a puppy) is getting enough time outside. Young dogs should go out to potty about every two hours. Adult dogs can usually make it several hours before having to go, but try to avoid waiting too long. Even if they’re good about not intentionally peeing in the house, a full bladder and too much excitement will make it harder for them to control themselves.

 In addition to frequent trips outside, training your pet to manage excitement urination takes time and repetition. Try some of the following techniques to help them work on controlling their bladder – even in the most stimulating and exciting of situations:

  • Be calm and quiet when you come home
  • Don’t make direct eye contact with them as you greet them
  • Ask any guests who come over to be calm when they come in, and quiet when they greet the dog
  • Don’t reprimand your dog or make a fuss if they do make a mess
  • If you know something exciting is about to happen, take your dog out to pee just before

 Unfortunately, there’s no magic formula or solution for stopping your dog’s excited accidents right away. The best thing you can do is to stay calm around them, especially when it comes to their triggers. It’s okay for your dog to get excited about things, but until they can learn to control their bladder while they’re excited, it’s up to you to set a calm, neutral tone. They’ll pick up on it faster than you might think.

Tips to Keep in Mind While Training

Again, your dog isn’t going to stop excitement urination overnight. There’s a good chance you’ll have to deal with accidents for a while as they’re learning how to manage their behaviors. Take care of yourself during this “training period.” You might be focused more on your furry friend than your own well-being, but self-care will make it easier for you to stay calm. It will also reduce your stress levels and make it less likely for you to get frustrated with your dog during the process.

Now might also be a good time to invest in quality pet cleaners that help to get rid of stains and smells. Or, consider keeping your dog in an area of the house that has vinyl tile, laminate flooring, or stone tile. These materials are much easier to clean up and won’t leave a bad odor behind.

Finally, until your dog is fully trained, you may need to adapt if you can’t help them avoid a triggering situation. For example, if you plan on having friends or family members over but your dog tends to urinate when people try to pet them or play with them, it might be best to stay outside. Consider switching things up to an outdoor dinner party or barbeque. Most people will have no complaints about spending more time outdoors, and you can make a day of it by including games, comfortable places to lounge, and great food.

When you’re outside, people can freely approach your dog and, even if they have an accident, it’ll be in the grass. You can also use it as a training opportunity. Ask a few guests to pet your dog, but make sure they’re doing so calmly and quietly. When your pooch sees they get the attention they want without someone having to rile them up, they’ll learn that they can sit quietly and receive the love and care they desire.

Accidents are a part of pet ownership, but excited accidents don’t have to occur forever. If your dog doesn’t have any underlying health conditions and no other behavioral problems, excited accidents can be managed. Keep these tips in mind and start training your dog as soon as possible. Before long, you won’t be cleaning up pet pee every day, and everything from coming home each day to giving your dog a little extra attention can become more enjoyable for both of you with a little bit of time and effort.

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