Few things are as frustrating as home security investments that do not operate the way that you need them to. For example, take an alarm system that routinely mistakes your dog for an intruder... and wastes no time alerting you and the entire neighborhood by sounding an intrusive and obnoxiously loud siren. You purchased the system to protect your family and all of its members, not to discriminate against the four-legged ones, right?

Keeping Eyes and Ears on your Pets

What you should probably consider instead is a home security system designed specifically to address these common false alarms triggered by free-roaming pets and their innocently wagging tails. Additionally, wouldn't it be great to also see and hear your pets during the day? Fortunately, there are many new developments in home automation that can help you do just that.

Dropcam Pro 1080p HD Indoor Wi-Fi Security Camera

Dropcam Pro 1080p HD Indoor Wi-Fi Security Camera

Security cameras have been used for years for people to keep eyes and ears on their babies. Because many people consider their pets to be their babies, why should keeping visual and audial tabs on them be any different?

The folks at Dropcam believe that a desire to watch and listen to your furry babies is just as valid as if they were humans! To prove it, they designed the "Dropcam Pro 1080p HD Indoor Wi-Fi Security Camera" as a cloud-based Wi-Fi video monitoring service that allows you to stay connected to your entire family.

For under $200, you can enjoy smartphone, tablet or computer alerts whenever the system detects activity within its 130-degree field of view. And with 8x zoom capability in premium HD video, you can truly feel like you are right there in the room with your pets even if you are miles away!

The time of day is also irrelevant, because the camera is equipped with night vision. And with the ability to interact via two-way talk, your pets can feel as if you are right there in the room with them, as well! Imagine how comforted you would both feel if you need not interrupt your nightly lullaby just because you've crossed state lines!

But the true brilliance of this system may lie in its optional cloud video recording capability. With this component, you can review footage, record it and make clips to share with friends, family and even the internet. Did you ever think your pup could be the next YouTube sensation?

Intellinet CMOS IP Bullet Shaped Surveillance Camera

Intellinet CMOS IP Bullet Shaped Surveillance Camera

If you want to spend less than $100, you can still feel safe and secure in your home as you monitor your pets from afar.

With the "Intellinet CMOS IP Bullet Shaped Surveillance Camera," you still enjoy the ability to see your home via the camera's remote viewing capability that provides excellent image quality using a progressive-scan image sensor. And with integrated multi-window motion detection, you'll always know who's wandering around your home when you're not there.

The only potential drawback here is the lack of a two-way talk component, but you can still hear what's going on in the room you're monitoring. But at the same time, the ability to connect to your home within your budget is a great thing and for around $90, this system has much to offer!

With summer vacations and more out of town trips scratching at the door, you can also leave your pets in the capable hands of an in-house pet sitter without fear of a complicated alarm system getting in the way of you enjoying your trip. Plus, with a hassle-free system, you can be sure your sitter will gladly volunteer for a repeat engagement rather than run screaming for the hills the next time you ask them to stay with your dog.

What other benefits can you see with getting an updated pet-friendly security or monitoring system for your home?

 

Rheney WilliamsAs a pet loving DIYer, Rheney Williams, often writes for The Home Depot about fun projects and solutions for your pets which include electrical topics such as home automation. Visit homedepot.com to find out more info on the Home Automation devices that Rheney mentions in this article.

By Natalie Gomez on Jun 19, 2014 at 11:00 am 0 Comments

While bringing home a rescue dog can be exciting for you, it can be terrifying to your new dog, especially if he is a more timid sort. Oftentimes, rescue dogs have gone through some sort of trauma, whether it's the trauma of abandonment, abuse, or having been a stray for an extended period of time. Before you bring your new family member home, put a plan in place for helping him adjust quickly to his new forever home. 

Rover Rescue
Give Three Days of No Demands
If your dog is particularly nervous, let him have space. Don't force attention he may not want; if he wants to be left alone, respect that. Give him his own space with a comfortable bed, food and water, toys/treats, and a kennel. Dogs are den creatures and feel more secure in their environment when they have their own "den" to escape to when they're feeling overwhelmed. Take him outside when he needs to, go for walks for exercise, and monitor him closely. Potty accidents, hole digging, or other destructive behavior can't occur if he's closely supervised. Make sure he feels safe, but also knows the rules. Be firm.

Provide Structure
Be consistent with your dog and use positive reinforcement. Simply put, bad behaviors get ignored or redirected and good behaviors get endless amounts of praise. When your new dog goes potty outside, make it a happy time. Lots of happy praise and treats will make your dog realize that going outside is what makes his new family happy. If he has an accident in the house, immediately take him outside and praise him heavily when he does his business where he's supposed to. However, don't be overly permissive. Yes, your dog has had a hard time, but that doesn't excuse poor behavior like growling, jumping, or destroying household items. 

Don't Bombard Him
You'll want to show your new furry friend off to everyone you know, but it's best to keep the environment quiet for a few weeks. One or two people coming in and out probably won't stress your pet out, but a birthday party or barbecue absolutely will. Avoid places like pet stores, dog parks, or other heavily populated social places, too. He needs to focus on adjusting to his new home and dropping new people or places in on him during this adjustment period can cause setbacks in getting adjusted. Make sure your dog won’t attack strangers. Often rescues have adapted to become more aggressive to deal with their environments. According to Taylor and Blair, personal injury lawyers in Surry BC, they say it is great to praise soft play. Be sure before they meet new people and animals they are well trained enough to avoid an accident like this.

The basic rule of having a new rescue dog is to keep things quiet. Allow him time to learn about his new people, his new bed, and his new rules. He's gone from a noisy shelter environment to a home and that can be intimidating, no matter how good of a change it is. If you ever have any dog behavior questions, contact a professional dog trainer to help you stay on the right track for a long lasting relationship with your dog.

 

Brooke ChaplanBrooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She has lived and worked in her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico after her graduation from the University of New Mexico. Contact her via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

 

By Natalie Gomez on Jun 04, 2014 at 2:30 pm 0 Comments

Properly socializing shy, timid dogs eliminates fear-based aggression. It also allows you and your furry friend to enjoy trips and activities together that are impossible with (and terrifying for) a fearful dog. Use these tips to design positive, productive training experiences that transform your bashful pup into a confident companion.

Six Tips for Training and Socializing a Shy Dog

Set the Place, Not the Pace

Introduce new people in a place where your dog feels safe, allowing the dog to make the first move, rather than letting strangers approach the animal. Visit with guests as usual and let your dog decide when and if introductions are necessary. Pushing too hard can cause the dog to react aggressively, so provide opportunities for your dog to socialize but don't force unwanted interactions with strangers.

Avoid Coddling

Resist the urge to calm a puppy that is showing fearful behavior, such as whimpering or whining. A soothing voice, gentle stroking and being picked up all unintentionally reward the dog for showing fear. Instead, ignore fearful behaviors that occur at inappropriate and unnecessary times.

Positive Reinforcement

Avoid rewarding unwanted behavior, but always praise shy dogs when they display confidence and bravery. Reward a timid dog with treats, attention and praise immediately after positive behaviors. Positive reinforcement is more effective than attempting to punish unwanted actions.

Treat After

When training a dog with treat or food rewards, always give a treat in clear response to appropriate behavior rather than using the treat in attempt to prompt the behavior. Tasty treats and real pet food can be effective for luring a dog into a situation outside their comfort level, but when the food distraction is gone, the dog may suddenly feel exposed and lash out or hide in fear.

One-on-One Training

Ironically, socialization training is best begun in private sessions rather than group classes. Learning and practicing basic obedience skills strengthens the bond between dog and owner, giving both the confidence to stay calm and trust each other later in more stressful and distracting socialization exercises.

Keep It Simple

Socializing dogs involves new experiences, as well as new people and animals. Exploring new sounds, sights, smells, textures, weather and tastes all build confidence. Things as simple as ice cubes, paper bags and opening umbrellas are interesting to puppies or under-socialized pets.

Proper training helps meek dogs face the world with excitement rather than fear. To set your pet up for success, allow your dog to set the pace during socialization activities and provide an escape route in case things get too intense. Curiosity will overcome trepidation with time and patience.

 

Emma Sturgis

Emma Sturgis is a freelance writer currently living in Boston. When not writing, she enjoys baking and indoor rock climbing. Find her on Google +

 

 

By Natalie Gomez on May 28, 2014 at 12:00 am 0 Comments