You've found the design you love! It will fit right into your decor and Fluffy's collar matches perfectly! But wait... what size do you need? Is Fluffy a small or a medium? Or maybe you want to buy it for Fluffy's bulldog best friend, Spike. Does he need a large or an extra large? 

Don't worry! Our office dogs Squish and Corbin are here to help. We asked them to take some time out during their busy day of product testing to compare bed sizes.

Do you have a large dog? Our friend Corbin is a 75-pound black lab. You can see the small and the medium lounge beds are way too small for him. If your large dog likes to feel like he's being given a warm hug while he's in bed then maybe the large is the right size for him. If he likes a little room to stretch out those long legs after a walk you might want to go with the extra large.

What size dog bed do you need?

French Bulldog Squish is a dense 23 pounds. All muscle if you ask him. Here he is trying out all four lounge bed sizes. He fits in the small but prefers a little more leg room so usually opts for the medium. The large and extra large are a bit too big for him to use solo but he enjoys cuddling with Corbin in the extra large.  

What size dog bed do you need?

What size of P.L.A.Y. bed does your dog sleep in? Want to know what size your dog should get? Ask us in the comments below and we would be happy to help you select the right size for your dog!

By Lauren Colman on Sep 11, 2013 at 12:00 pm 0 Comments
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While some dog owners are content with feeding their pets generic kibble, this diet doesn't always provide proper nutrition. Dogs need a variety of nutrients, much like their human caretakers. An improperly balanced diet can cause problems ranging from lackluster fur, to life-threatening undernourishment. Certain foods can be added to your dog’s diet to prevent these ailments. The amount of these foods varies with each dog, so consult your vet before making any dietary changes.

Dog Diet

Bagged Food

Always look at the label. Any product that uses cornmeal as its base, isn't a good choice. Dogs don’t naturally consume a high amount of grains, so it doesn't make much sense to base their diet around them. Select a food that is made of a protein like chicken or beef instead. It is best to choose a pre-prepared food that is well balanced. Other nutritious foods can be added later if needed. 

Protein

Protein is the building block for your pet's muscles. As such, it is vital for dogs to have the proper amount of protein. Weak muscles and skin problems are often a sign that your dog needs more protein in its diet. Fish, eggs, chicken, and beef all help alleviate protein deficiency.

Fat

Be aware of the fat content. Too much can cause liver problems, and too little can cause skin issues. If you find your pet's skin is flaky and dry it may be time to think about adding more fat to their diet. 10% -15% is the recommended range.

Grains

Grains should not make up the majority of a dog’s diet, but they may still be included. Grains are a good source of carbohydrates. Some may argue that they cause digestive problems, but the inclusion of grains is up to you. Monitor your pet for gluten allergies if you switch their food. These allergies are relatively rare, but it never hurts to be alert. Talk to your vet if your dog becomes itchy as this may indicate an allergy. 

Raw Food

Raw diets are based on the idea of a dog’s diet in nature. Meat and vegetables comprise the majority of raw diets. With a raw diet, there is less room for fillers like cornmeal. Purchasing raw food from a reputable sourcemaximizes the benefits of a raw diet. Many users report a shinier coat and overall improved health when they switch to a raw diet.

Whichever food you choose, make the appropriate adjustments for your pet. Good nutrition is the first step in ensuring the extended health of your four legged friend.

 

Brooke Chaplan is a writer and blogger from Los Lunas, NM. She loves to run, hike and bike and you can contact her via twitter @BrookeChaplan. For more information on raw food diets visit rawpetfood.com.
By Lauren Colman on Aug 20, 2013 at 6:00 am 0 Comments
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Whether you want a lab, terrier, Australian shepherd, or a poodle, you will discover that you need to figure out if you are ready for the responsibility! A dog requires a great deal of time, care and investment, and you should only get one if you can provide all three. Consider some of the following and decide if you are ready for a dog.

Dachshund

Time

Dogs require time, and though some require less than others, they all need it to some degree. Make sure to do some research on breeds and their character traits. Some are more high maintenance and attention needing than others. Don't get a puppy just for the novelty of having puppy. Dogs grow up and from the time they are puppies to old age, they need and deserve the same amount of attention regardless of whether or not they are a puppy.

Regular Schedule

A regular schedule is something that is ideal for most dogs. If you are on a regular schedule, your doggy will know what is going on, and in turn, that will make them a great deal calmer about what is going on in their lives. Do you have a schedule that suits the breed that you are considering? If you are out of town all the time, you may not want to get one until you can be home more often.

Costs

Most vets say that dog owners or future dog owners need to consider the cost for caring for your furry four legged friends. Vet costs are by far the most expensive, but in addition to that, remember there is still food, leashes, toys, grooming etc..  Are you ready to shoulder the cost? There are several places on line you can look for average monthly or even yearly costs for the dog breed you're considering.

Children

Do you have children in the home, and if so, how will that affect your ability to have a dog? There are some breeds that do really well with kids and others that don't.  Some dogs just don't adjust well to newborns but are fine with older kids. It just depends, so make sure you look into it before you go out and get a dog.

Home

Is your home ready for a dog? For example, if you live in a tiny city apartment, you may find that you are not suited for having an Australian cattle dog, which is known for its bright spirits and boundless energy. If your home is full of delicate things, you may want to think about how you are going to deal with a bouncy high-spirited puppy!

Consider all these things and you can be assured that both you and man’s best friend will be much happier!

 

Andraea Campbell is 27 and lives in Kahuku, Hawaii on the island of Oahu. She is a free lance writer, blogger, surfer, skateboarder and a pet lover and goes to Carmel IN Veterinarians. She went to school at the University of  Hawaii and graduated with a degree in communications. Hang Loose and Mahalo!
By Lauren Colman on Aug 12, 2013 at 6:00 am 1 Comments
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