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By Lauren Colman on Aug 06, 2013 at 10:24 am 2 Comments

Music has a tendency to be a comfort to us, which is why we usually have tines playing everywhere we turn-- whether we’re stuck in traffic with the radio on or overhearing it while shopping at the mall. When we’re stressed, bored or depressed, we turn to our favorite artists to give us a sense of relief. Whatever emotion we want to feel, we can usually find a song that can put us in the right mood. So, why can’t the same go for our pets?

Gray Cat

When the animals we love most are feeling anxious or depressed, music can be just the mood enhancer they need. Through the use of music, we can help control our pet’s disposition to increase their quality of life.

 

The Calming Effect

Just as music has the ability to calm our human nerves, music can do the same for your cat or dog. Some people opt to leave their radio on at home all day while they’re at work in order to keep their pets calm. The type of music chosen depends on the owner, but keeping music on while you leave your pets at home has proven results. It allows the animals to feel engaged all day, instead of feel the loneliness that sometimes creeps in and causes them to lash out.

Try leaving some calming music on at home while you are away at work. You can either turn on your own radio or play music online through sites like Arena and Pandora.

 

Vibrations From The Piano

Experts often recommend piano music to be played to dogs when they seem anxious. It’s not so much the tunes you decide to play that matter to the dog; what really matters are the vibrations that come from the piano.Sound researchers have observed that vibrations can actually de-stress a dog. 

Since stress on an animal can potentially lead to chronic illness, it’s important to keep them calm and comfortable, especially when at home. Not only does piano music keep them peaceful, it can also drastically improve their chances of living a full and healthy life.

Puppies

The Right Sound

The right combination of pitch, tone and tempo can turn an anxious animal into a peaceful pet. Some animal psychologists believe that the music we often listen to might not necessarily be what our pets want to hear, as it doesn’t reach the ranges of pitch, tone and tempo that they specifically enjoy.

In 2009, researchers wrote a few songs for tamarin monkeys that were three octaves higher than what humans usually enjoy. While the music would be completely annoying to a human due to its shrill sound, the monkeys actually loved it. In terms of heart rate and interests, we couldn’t be more different from our pets; however, their type of music has the same effect on them as what our favorite music does on us.

 

Music Made Specifically for Cats

A music company created by animal psychologists, called Music for Cats, has done extensive research on the type of sounds that our feline friends respond to best. Each song is connected to their vocalization frequency range and resting heart rate. You can find the songs online for $1.99 each. While the company is researching what sort of music dogs would enjoy, research has discovered that they respond better to human music than cats do.

 

Music To Avoid

While each animal is different, it’s best to avoid any music with loud sounds, as many animals are more sensitive to these noises than humans are. In most cases, using a trial-and-error method may be the best way to determine what exactly your pet enjoys listening to most.

 

Marcela De Vivo is a freelance writer, mother of three and has two Great Danes of her own. Her dogs personally enjoy listening to alternative music, which helps to keep them calm while she focuses on her work. Follow her on Facebook today!
By Lauren Colman on Jul 16, 2013 at 5:05 pm 0 Comments