There are dogs that can eat and digest just about anything that you throw at them without showing any hint of discomfort or ill effects. If you have such a resilient dog, then you are a lucky guy. For there is another breed of dog, one which has a very sensitive stomach.  Unless you follow a strict dietary routine, their stomach and intestines are constantly in a state of disarray causing them severe discomfort. If your dog is frequently experiencing diarrhea and gas problems, then they are good indicators that it has a weak stomach and you have to treat it accordingly. 

Freddie Ardley Photography

Photo Source: Freddie Ardley Photography

Signs that indicate your dog has a sensitive stomach

There are a hundred symptoms that may indicate that your dog has a sensitive stomach or a weak digestive system. But here we list the top three symptoms:

  • Vomiting is the first sign that its digestive system is out of order and needs some attention
  • The dog occasionally passes loose stools
  • It has a very terrible gas problem

Your dog is down and out and you are worried

Having a dog that is down can also dampen your spirits, for they are no longer their playful self that you enjoy so much. And as a concerned owner you obviously can’t wait for it to regain its health and for the happy days to return. In such a situation, you must take heart from the fact that stomach ailments are common in dogs and are very much TREATABLE.

What should be your response?

The first thing you need to do when you discover that the dog has stomach issues is to check whether it is a continuous issue or a one-off incident that can be overlooked. Sometimes there may be a medical condition that needs to be taken care of, so you are advised to consult a professional vet. The vet can diagnose the problem and tell you whether the issues are indicative of any health issues or they are merely because of a fragile digestive system. More often than not, all stomach related ailments have one common denominator: food. So, the more precaution you take when it comes to its food, the healthier it will be.

Preparing the diet

When preparing its diet, you must bear it in mind that all dog food is not the same. The mistake invariably happens because most dog foods looks and smells the same, but if you look more carefully at the list of ingredients it won’t be long before you will notice the difference. Ask your vet to prepare a list of ingredients that suit your dog and match that with the dog food that you are buying. This way you are less likely to purchase food that may cause a stomach upset in your dog.

The above mentioned procedure of comparing ingredients before making the purchase, though, has one downside to it in that it is a very time consuming process. With dog food being prepared on a mass scale, finding the dog food that is suitable to your dog may turn out to be a daunting mission. What can be even more frustrating is to discover that you have missed a certain ingredient or there is an unwanted ingredient in the dog food you have purchased,  so while making the purchase be careful. Go for dog food that has salmon, tuna, sweet potatoes, potatoes, and duck as key ingredients as apart from being delicious, they are easily digestible.

Special dog food in the market

Dog food manufacturers are aware of the fact that there is a big market for them in this segment, that is the digestible food segment, and are therefore flooding the market with foods that are specially meant for dogs with a sensitive stomach. Whether your dog is having food allergies or a simple stomach problem, the general composition of these food is such that you shouldn’t have any problem serving them to your dog. Some of the specialized dog foods that you can try are Twistix Pumpkin Large, Twistix Pumpkin Small, Hills Science Plan Adult Sensitive Stomach Chicken, Purina ONE Sensitive Systems Dry Dog Food, HillScienceDiet, and Blue Buffalo Wilderness Dry Dog food. Though these foods are primarily targeted at dogs with sensitive stomachs, if you have a healthy dog with no history of stomach ailments, even then you can feed them these specialized foods as they are healthy and have many benefits.

Elevated feeders: It is not always about the food, but the way it is being served that is important

Then again, stomach issues don’t necessarily always have to do with the type of food that it is served, but the way it is being served. Let me explain. When you place the feeder bowl on the floor, the dog has to bend down every time he takes a slurp or bite. Now if your dog has a gas problem, it can aggravate the problem and if it doesn’t, then there is a chance that the routine may cause one. The solution to the problem is to put the bowl in an elevated position which won’t require the dog to bend down. Elevated feeders have been certified by experts as a crucial step in reducing gas pressure on the stomach, and are also known to assist in the digestion process.

Don’t rush things when introducing a new diet

Once you have decided what and how to feed your dog, start slowly introducing the new food to the dog’s diet. You must be careful not to fast-track the new food for the dog may take a dislike to it and refuse to eat it. If that happens, you will have a long-drawn battle at hand. That is not all, for any sudden changes in food habits may cause digestive problems, which would be such a shame considering that it was the very problem that you had set out to fix in the first place. But if you manage to join all the dots correctly, it would ensure that your dog is healthy and full of energy.

 

LaurenLauren is a homemaker who loves pets. She owns 2 pets, a cat named “Macavity” and a dog named “Chilly”. She is currently living in NYC with her family. In her part time, she loves to share articles on pets and home improvement. You can get in touch with her on Google Plus

By Natalie Gomez 43 days ago at 11:00 am 0 Comments
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While bringing home a rescue dog can be exciting for you, it can be terrifying to your new dog, especially if he is a more timid sort. Oftentimes, rescue dogs have gone through some sort of trauma, whether it's the trauma of abandonment, abuse, or having been a stray for an extended period of time. Before you bring your new family member home, put a plan in place for helping him adjust quickly to his new forever home. 

Rover Rescue
Give Three Days of No Demands
If your dog is particularly nervous, let him have space. Don't force attention he may not want; if he wants to be left alone, respect that. Give him his own space with a comfortable bed, food and water, toys/treats, and a kennel. Dogs are den creatures and feel more secure in their environment when they have their own "den" to escape to when they're feeling overwhelmed. Take him outside when he needs to, go for walks for exercise, and monitor him closely. Potty accidents, hole digging, or other destructive behavior can't occur if he's closely supervised. Make sure he feels safe, but also knows the rules. Be firm.

Provide Structure
Be consistent with your dog and use positive reinforcement. Simply put, bad behaviors get ignored or redirected and good behaviors get endless amounts of praise. When your new dog goes potty outside, make it a happy time. Lots of happy praise and treats will make your dog realize that going outside is what makes his new family happy. If he has an accident in the house, immediately take him outside and praise him heavily when he does his business where he's supposed to. However, don't be overly permissive. Yes, your dog has had a hard time, but that doesn't excuse poor behavior like growling, jumping, or destroying household items. 

Don't Bombard Him
You'll want to show your new furry friend off to everyone you know, but it's best to keep the environment quiet for a few weeks. One or two people coming in and out probably won't stress your pet out, but a birthday party or barbecue absolutely will. Avoid places like pet stores, dog parks, or other heavily populated social places, too. He needs to focus on adjusting to his new home and dropping new people or places in on him during this adjustment period can cause setbacks in getting adjusted. Make sure your dog won’t attack strangers. Often rescues have adapted to become more aggressive to deal with their environments. According to Taylor and Blair, personal injury lawyers in Surry BC, they say it is great to praise soft play. Be sure before they meet new people and animals they are well trained enough to avoid an accident like this.

The basic rule of having a new rescue dog is to keep things quiet. Allow him time to learn about his new people, his new bed, and his new rules. He's gone from a noisy shelter environment to a home and that can be intimidating, no matter how good of a change it is. If you ever have any dog behavior questions, contact a professional dog trainer to help you stay on the right track for a long lasting relationship with your dog.

 

Brooke ChaplanBrooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She has lived and worked in her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico after her graduation from the University of New Mexico. Contact her via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

 

By Natalie Gomez 49 days ago at 2:30 pm 0 Comments
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One of the biggest mistakes new puppy owners make is not crate training. Teaching your puppy to sleep happily in a crate while you're in bed or while you're away for the day can make or break your house-training journey and save your favorite couch from sharp little puppy teeth!

Training Your Pup - Kennels and Crates

Choose the Right "Den"

Dogs are den animals, holding onto this evolutionary instinct from their wild predecessors. To your domesticated dog, his den is the place he will go when he's tired, frightened, or just wants to escape to "his" place. With a puppy, don't give him a huge crate. He needs something that's big enough to stand up, sit down, and turn around in. Any bigger will encourage him to potty in his kennel. You need to choose immediately if you want your dog to be an inside or an outside dog. Building a chain link kennel outside would provide ease in this process and will teach your puppy more self dependence.

Introduce the Crate

Leave the crate in the most frequented room of your house. If the family congregates mostly in the kitchen, then leave his crate there with the door open. Add a comfortable bed or even an old t-shirt that smells like his favorite family member. Leave the door off at first so he can go in and out unencumbered. Some dogs will immediately go in and get comfortable; if yours isn't one of them, entice him in by dropping tasty food treats in front of the crate and gradually just inside the door.

Let Him Eat in the Crate

Dogs won't soil where they eat so by feeding his meals inside the kennel, you're teaching him two things: this isn't where he's supposed to relieve himself and this is a safe, happy place. If he's willingly going in and out of the kennel, put the food bowl at the back. If he's still showing some reluctance, put it in just enough to keep him from being anxious. After a few days, he should be eating comfortably in the crate. This is when you begin shutting the door. The first time, open it as soon as he finishes his meal. Gradually, leave the door closed for a longer period of time after he's done eating.

Crate Him While You're at Home

It's important to not just shut him in the kennel and leave for your 8 hour work day. Instead, leave him kenneled for short periods of time while you're at home. When you let him out, give him praise but don't make it a big deal. His crate should be a daily part of his routine, not something that's out of the ordinary.

Leave for Short Periods of Time

When you finally leave him alone, make your trips short. Leave him in the crate just to run to the post office or to the grocery store for some bread and milk. Don't make a big fuss when you leave; urge him into the kennel, shut the door, and leave. Prolonged goodbyes can make a dog feel more anxious. Make sure that every time you put him in the kennel, you're putting him in at different times as you're getting ready to leave. Some days put him in while you're putting your shoes on, other times put him in right as you get out of the shower. If you develop a predictable pattern, a more anxious puppy will begin to fret when you hit the point in your routine where he'll be kenneled. When you get home, don't get excited to see him. Keep your arrivals low-key to prevent any anxiety.

Don't let a puppy's sad eyes make you feel bad for kennel training. Older dogs who have been properly introduced to the kennel seek their crate out as a safe haven and genuinely enjoy being there. Train your puppy gently and consistently and his crate will become a happy hideaway for the rest of his life.

 

Erika RemmingtonThis article was written by Erika Remmington. Erika is a recent graduate from the University of California, Berkeley. In her spare time she enjoys spending time with her husband and 18 month old daughter. Click here to contact Erika.

 

 

Informational credit to Lynx Brand Fence Products Ltd., An Edmonton Dog Kennel Chain Link Fence Company

By Natalie Gomez 53 days ago at 10:00 am 0 Comments
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